GUSTATIO

 


 

      Below you will find the recipes for the ‘GUSTATIO’ dishes that have been served most regularly at our Roman Banquets.

 

 

      Click on the links in the box below to take you to each dish.

 

 

GUSTATIO

DATES ALEXANDRINE 

EPITYRUM

GUSTUM DE PRAECOQUIS

'DORMOUSE' WITH HONEY & POPPY-SEEDS

QUAILS' EGGS

OTHER POSSIBILITIES

 

 

 


 

         DATES  ALEXANDRINE

 

   Ingredients:    Dates
                        Blanched almonds
                        Ground cinnamon
                        Honey

         Remove pits from the dates, and replace them with the blanched almonds, first rolled in the ground cinnamon.

         Sprinkle a little more cinnamon (to taste) over the dates; then drizzle with plenty of honey.

         Heat through in a moderate oven (do not overcook!) and serve warm.

 

 

 

 


 

 EPITYRUM (BLACK & GREEN OLIVES WITH HERBS)

     

           Ingredients:  Green and black olives
                              Olive oil
                               Red-wine vinegar
                               Rocket leaves
                               Fennel fern
                               A couple of sprigs of garden mint
                               Some coriander leaf (if desired)

 

         Pit the olives and chop coarsely. Chop up together all the herbs (use plenty) and mix in with the olives.

         Drizzle on several spoonfuls of olive oil and vinegar - enough to add a tang without drowning the other ingredients.

 

 

 


 

GUSTUM DE PRAECOQUIS
                (DRIED APRICOTS WITH MINT & HONEY)

 

 


            Ingredients:  Dried apricots
                               Honey
                               Ground cinnamon
                               White grape juice (or grapefruit juice)
                               A little cider-vinegar
                               Some sprigs of garden mint and lemon balm
                               Squeeze of lemon juice

 

            Chop the dried apricots coarsely. Sprinkle with cinnamon to taste.

            Chop the mint and lemon balm (as much as you like!) and mix with the apricots. Drizzle liberally with honey; pour on the fruit juice (enough to moisten the whole bowl without making it too 'liquidy'), add a splash of cider-vinegar, and mix thoroughly.

             Squeeze a little lemon juice over the dish before serving.

 

 

 

 


 

"DORMOUSE" WITH HONEY & POPPY-SEEDS

 

          Ingredients:  'Dormouse substitute' sausages
                              Honey
                              Poppy-seeds

 

         The original Roman recipe involved cleaning out the mouse, stuffing with herbs and spices, and then encasing it in clay: after it had been baked, the clay would be cracked away, taking the fur and skin with it…!

        As 'dormouse substitute', pork sausages do fine - the ones with apple seem to go particularly well with the honey; equally possible would be ones with apricot. Anything savoury should be avoided.

        Bake the sausages, pouring off all the excess fat regularly, until they are well-coloured. Remove from the pan and again mop off any lingering fat.

        Pour honey generously over the sausages, and sprinkle poppy-seeds on top.

        Easy as that!

 

 

 


 

QUAILS' EGGS

 

            Ingredients:  Quails' eggs
                               Celery-salt

         For a medium-hard-boiled egg, bring plenty of water to the boil, add eggs carefully, and simmer for 3 minutes.

         Cool immediately in cold running water.

          Serve with celery-salt as a dip (some younger or inexperienced guests may need reminding to peel the eggs first….I've known it happen….!).

 

 

 

 


 

OTHER EASY POSSIBILITIES

 

         One constant favourite, which needs no special preparation, is WATERMELON, simply chopped into chunks. The refreshing taste works especially well with some of the more exotic flavours above!

         Equally easy to obtain (rather than make) would be anchovies dressed ad lib., garlic snails (for the more adventurous), and any type of pickled vegetable 'under oil' as the modern Italians put it.